eCommerce Lifestyle
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Why Should Anyone Buy From You?

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​If you’re wondering why customers will buy from you, then you need to check out my new podcast. In today’s episode, I share actionable tips on how you can attract more customers to buy from your store.

If you have any questions, feel free to tag me on social media! 

What's Covered in This Episode:


​How to compete with resellers:

  • ​Monetary
  • ​Non-Monetary
If you liked today’s show, please subscribe on iTunes to The eCommerce Lifestyle Podcast! The podcast is also available on all major podcast players including, Stitcher and Spotify.

Links From This Episode:

This ​podcast is also available in video form. Click ‘Play’ below to start watching. Make sure to subscribe to our YouTube Channel for weekly updates and insights!

Transcript

Hey, what's up guys? Anton Kraly here from ecommercelifestyle.com and welcome back to the podcast. If you're new here, just know that this show comes out every single Monday and Thursday, and all of the episodes are designed to help you to increase your revenue, automate your operations and become number one in your niche, regardless of what you're selling. And if that sounds interesting to you, be sure to go to whatever podcast player you use, search for eCommerce Lifestyle, we should come up right at the top. And click subscribe, so you can get notified every time a new episode comes out. So, yesterday I was doing a live stream on Facebook and, by the way, it was really, that was awesome. If you were there, thank you for the questions because we had a lot of questions and some really good ones, but one of them that came in that I wanted to take a little bit more time to address was from Ben Franklin.

So, I don't know if that's your real name, especially because the Facebook avatar is just that white cutout of a face. If it is a real name, that's awesome. But the question said, "Hi, Anton, would you explain the value a customer would have with buying from a retailer's online store versus directly from a supplier who also has an online store selling the same products?" So, great question, and it basically is why would anyone buy from you or me? Now, the reason I wanted to address this on the podcast is because I know we have a bunch of listeners who run, what I would consider, a traditional eCommerce store, where they either sell their own branded products or they have their own warehouse and they sell other people's products, but they might be considering drop shipping and working with other brands, meaning selling for other brands on their existing eCommerce store.

And one of the sticking points or hesitations is, why would anyone buy this other company's products on my store when they can just buy it from company ABC on their main website? Well, that's a fair question, but what you have to understand is on our stores, we are not trying to sell for any direct-to- consumer brands. Now, direct-to-consumer basically means the company that makes the products or that brands the products, their business is not only manufacturing or branding, but it's also to sell and to handle fulfillment, and to do all of that. Now, direct-to-consumer is something that really has seen a huge increase in the amount of companies that do it, over the past decade. But the direct-to-consumer brands are still a very small sliver out of all the companies out there that actually make products.

So all of the strategies that you probably used to use and definitely the ones that we used to use, we're still using and they're still working just as well as before and that's because even though part of Google Shopping is free now, Google product listing ads are not free. And the keyword there is ads. Okay. So you have Google product listings. You have Google Shopping, which is the tab people can click on. Let's say you go to google.com, search for a chandelier. If you click shopping, you're going to see physical products for sale. Okay. But Google shopping ads or Google product listing ads are the paid ones. So what's the difference. If you were to say three weeks ago, what's the difference? There was no difference because it was just all paid. Now Google is opening up basically some free real estate where people can rank organically in the Google Shopping tab.

And one of the sticking points or hesitations is, why would anyone buy this other company's products on my store when they can just buy it from company ABC on their main website? Well, that's a fair question, but what you have to understand is on our stores, we are not trying to sell for any direct-to- consumer brands. Now, direct-to-consumer basically means the company that makes the products or that brands the products, their business is not only manufacturing or branding, but it's also to sell and to handle fulfillment, and to do all of that. Now, direct-to-consumer is something that really has seen a huge increase in the amount of companies that do it, over the past decade. But the direct-to-consumer brands are still a very small sliver out of all the companies out there that actually make products.

Now, the type of companies that we work for, or work with, I should say, and that we sell for, are the ones that focus on making excellent products, but that's kind of where their business stops. They do the product research, they make the products, they get them into a warehouse, but then they look for retailers, like us, to bring in the sales. So, really the type of companies that we sell for, and that you sell for, if you're drop shipping, do not sell direct to the public. Again, their business is making great products and then our business is getting sales for those products. Direct-to-consumer is a totally different business model, it's a great one, but it's not in the wheelhouse that we work in with our drop shipping stores. So, keep that in mind. Now, the other thing that you might find is that, maybe you find the brand or a supplier that makes great products, you can sell them, but they also sell them on their website.

So, is there ever a time that you should sell those products on your store as well? And yes, there's a couple of different scenarios where we do this and we actually do really well. So, the first scenario is, if supplier ABC or brand ABC sells on their website, but they sell products at MSRP. So, manufacturer's suggested retail price. So, let's just say MSRP on a product is a thousand dollars and on that brand's website, they have it available to buy at that price, at a thousand dollars. But they also work with retailers like us and allow us to sell it MAP, that stands for minimum advertised price. And let's just say, MAP is $800. So, then the customer, or potential customer, could buy direct from the brand for a thousand or buy from us for 800. Okay, good. We'll do that.

And I'll talk about how we can stand out in a little bit, but that is fine. Another time that you might be willing to basically compete with a brand that sells direct to the public is if you go to their online store, when you're doing your research, and see that it looks like it hasn't been updated since 1996, right? It doesn't look trustworthy. It loads slow. There's barely any information on it. It's hard to even find the add to cart button, and honestly, it just doesn't look trustworthy. And we've found this more often than not, where some of these companies do have an eCommerce side to their business, but we can just tell it's not making them money by the experience we have when we're on their website as a potential customer. And that's really what this comes down to because the next question would be, right ...

Well, okay, let's just say it's one of those scenarios, the company we want to sell for, either they don't sell direct to consumer, so, okay, great, we could sell for them or they sell at MSRP, we can sell at MAP. Okay, great. Or they sell at the same price we could sell for, but their website's terrible. Okay. Awesome. The next level here is, well, we're still going to have competition, right? Because we're not the only sales channel of these retailers or these manufacturers. There's other people that we're competing with, other online retailers. So, why would anybody choose us over them and what it comes down to, if I was going to describe it in one word, is value and the company that can provide the most value, the retailer that can provide the most value to the prospective buyer is the one that's going to win. And value could either be monetary or it can also be non-monetary, so give you some examples.

One example of a way to stand out from competition, monetarily, would be by having product discounts. So, I sell the product for 800 bucks and you say, "Hey, I'm willing to sell it to the same customer for 700 bucks because I'll take a smaller profit margin." Well, yeah, that can be perceived as value, right? It's financial value. It's monetary value. Now, to do that, you would either have to violate a MAP policy, minimum advertised price policy, or do it like on a one-off basis with customers. But yeah, that could be perceived as monetary value. Another thing you could do in terms of value, which we do, and I recommend, is include different bonus offers with different products.

So, maybe you're selling a standup desk, I'm at one right now, I'm sitting at it, but you're selling a standup desk and you say, "When you buy from mysite.com, I'm going to include a free desk lamp valued at a hundred bucks." And maybe the cost to you on that desk lamp is 50 bucks, normally sells for a hundred, but you give that away to your customers. So it's a $50 cost to you, for a thousand dollars sale, right? That's also monetary value because you're giving something that actually is worth money.

Now, let's talk about some more ways to stand out from the competition and more reasons why people could choose you that are not monetary, okay. Things that don't have actual dollars attached. Some of them could just be expert level support. So, things like live chat on your website, things like answering the phone when someone calls, things like responding to emails quickly and actually really providing the answers to the questions that come in, that does have a lot of value and we've got tons of sales from people that we just answered and provided value to. That is value, that will get you sales.

Another nonmonetary value thing is relationships and this could either be relationships that you build via email marketing, by building your email list, or from your social media channels as you build followings there. As you do that, if you communicate right, which by the way, I teach you all this inside of my program, Drop Ship Lifestyle, so check out dropshipwebinar.com if you're just getting started. That's D-R-O-P-S-H-I-P webinar.com.

But just know that if you're doing this and you're building relationships, that is also value, that will get you more sales, that will have more people choose you. Another type of value is just educational. So, this could be things like having blog posts that appeal to your customer avatar. This could be things like having buyer's guides on your website, that helps guide the potential buyer to the correct product for them. Again, it's not giving them money, it's not giving them a product, but it's providing them with value that will build that relationship that could have them choose you. And finally, one more tip I'll give you in this podcast, which is so important and so overlooked in the world of drop shipping, specifically, is your product pages and how much value they provide to the shopper.

So, what a lot of online stores do is they get approved to sell for supplier ABC. They take the main image of that product, they put it on their store, they set the price, they copy and paste the description, boom products uploaded. Let's go, buy it from me, right? Yeah, you can do that and you'll make some sales, but if you want to provide more value than everybody else, then find every single image there is of that product online. Ones that you are authorized to use. Get those up on your website. Are there any videos that you could show off to the buyer, that will help them make their buying decision? Can you rewrite the description or build it out to answer the frequently asked questions that potential buyers have? Could you include information that your competition isn't including?

Maybe things like if a warranty is included or what the return period is, or how quickly this specific product ships. What are the things that you can share with the potential customer that your competition isn't? Again, nonmonetary but valuable, and when you build that relationship, when you provide more value to that person on your store, you will win, you will get the sale. So, for Ben Franklin, if that is your real name, I hope you found that answer helpful. And everybody else that's either listening or watching, I hope you did as well. If you did, please do me a favor, guys, trying to grow this podcast, increase our reach, help more people build highly profitable eCommerce stores. Go over to whatever podcast player you use. When you find the podcast, please leave a review, helps get the word out, and I do read all of those comments. So, thank you everybody for listening. Appreciate you. Hope you have a great week in sales and I will talk to you in the next episode. See ya.

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